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New Jersey Offshore Fishing Report 10-13-17

<b>Shark River Inlet</b>

Six yellowfin tuna 70 to 90 pounds were bagged and a half-dozen were lost on a trip Sunday to Monday on the <b>Golden Eagle</b> from Belmar, a report said on the party boat’s website. Weather wasn’t so bad, despite a tough forecast. The year’s final tuna trip aboard will sail this coming Sunday to Monday, and space is available. Reservations are required. Inshore trips caught bluefish, bonito and false albacore Tuesday and Wednesday and were weathered out since. But the weekend’s weather looks fishable for the trips.

After trips to the offshore canyons were weathered out two weeks, one of the trips had the weather to sail last Friday to Saturday on the <b>Katie H</b> from Belmar, Capt. Mike said. One yellowfin tuna 65 pounds was trolled, and some mahi mahi were chunked. The catch was alright, he said, and at first, the trip fished at Hudson Canyon. But water was chilly at 64 degrees, and not much life was around. Not even mahi hit, when the trip trolled near lobster-pot buoys. So the trip headed south, finding water 66 ½ degrees, and the yellowfin was trolled. At night, the mahi were hooked, and plenty of tuna were read, but none bit. Lots of life filled the water, including squid. The anglers tried everything, including 30-pound, fluorocarbon leaders. Fishing sounded about the same on other boats. Fish-holding water looked to be far south, like around Baltimore and Poorman’s canyons. The next one of the trips was slated for today, and the trips are scheduled for every weekend this month.

<b>Manasquan Inlet</b>

Tuna fishing was very sporadic at offshore canyons, said John from <b>The Reel Seat</b> in Brielle. Some boats caught decent, and some scored none. More of the fish seemed trolled than chunked, but some were jigged. No particular place seemed to produce best, or the catches seemed spread out. Anglers fishing mid-shore for bonito and false albacore that bit saw tuna sometimes, and sometimes had tuna spool reels intended for the bonito and albies. Fishing for mahi mahi was pretty darn good from the Mudhole to all the way offshore.

<b>Barnegat Inlet</b>

An overnight tuna trip was weathered out that was supposed to fish Sunday to Monday on the <b>Super Chic</b> from Barnegat Light, Capt. Ted said. The next is slated for Saturday. An inshore charter bailed that was supposed to fish this past Saturday for catches like bluefish and bonito.

Two shots of tuna showed up at night on a trip Friday to Saturday on the <b>Miss Barnegat Light</b>, the party boat’s Facebook page said. The first tumbled in a 2 a.m. “Had a few fish on,” the page said, and a good-sized yellowfin tuna and a 100-pound bigeye tuna were landed. Three more yellowfins were bagged at first light. That was all on a drift in 4,000 feet of water offshore of the Continental Shelf. Then the trip pot-hopped for mahi mahi, tackling plenty, before heading home. On a trip Saturday to Sunday, no tuna bit. A few sharks chomped off lines at night. Lots of squid schooled the water early in the night. In the morning, the trip pot-hopped and “put a catch of mahi together … .”  <a href="http://www.missbarnegatlight.com/TunaFishing.html" target="_blank">Tuna trips</a> are fishing throughout the month, and telephone to reserve.

<b>Cape May Inlet</b>

An offshore trip Friday to Saturday plowed 54 tilefish, 18 mahi mahi, a 68-inch white marlin and a small swordfish that was released aboard, said Capt. Tom from <b>Fishin’ Fever Sportfishing</b> from Cape May. Open-boat trips and charters for tiles are sailing until sea bass trips begin Oct. 22, opening day of sea bass season.

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